Kauai Activities

For the best Kauai Activities for your Vacation - Search Here!

 

Kauai Coffee Company

kauai coffeeThe Kauai coffee company is an important part of Kauai Island history and commerce. Here is some information pertaining to the Kauai coffee company history and production of its unique and flavorful crop.

The Kauai Coffee company began in the early 1800′s as the McBryde Sugar company. This was one of the first sugar growers in Hawaii and has grown substantially over the years.

The Kauai coffee company owns a total of 22,000 acres of land on this island which makes it one of the largest landowners. In 1987, McBryde Sugar Company became the Kauai Coffee Company.

Although the company has prospered over the years, it suffered a significant loss in 1992 when Hurrican Iniki hit the island and caused significant damage to the coffee crop. However, it recovered and continued to develop. In 1996, the company harvested the highest volume of coffee from the entire Kona region.

Since coffee is a type of fruit, it develops beautiful blossoms. These later develop into coffee cherries. Each cherry usually has two seeds which is what is processed to eventually become the coffee bean.

The blossoming of these coffee plants normally begins in February. The young fruit begins to form around May and when is becomes fully ripened in September, then the harvesting begins.

The harvesting is similar to how grapes are harvested in areas like the Napa Valley. The harvesting period normally begins around mid October and runs through December.

As the cherries are harvested, they proceed to a wet processing plant where the cherries are separated depending on their state of maturity and quality. The Kauai coffee company produces five different grades of coffee from this wet processing plant.

The next step of the process is called pulping where the ripe coffee cherries get the skin and fleshy fruit portion removed. Then these pulped beans are washed with high pressure water in order to remove a sticky coating.

At that point, the drying process begins. The beans go through several stages where moisture is carefully removed to bring it to about a 12% concentration.

Following this the beans go through a milling process to further process the beans and remove unwanted materials. At that point it gets subject to a variety of inspections, sorting, and grading processes.

Once the beans have been properly sorted, they are ready to be carefully roasted. The beans are roasted right on the Kauai coffee company estate for maximum freshness and quality control. Once completed they can be shipped for you to enjoy.

This summary of the Kauai coffee company history and production processes will hopefully provide you a better appreciation for how this region to provide you with such flavorful and enjoyable coffee.


Places for Play

Kauai PlayKauai Places for Play

Located just south of the Wailua River, Lydgate Park is like a dream come true for families traveling with babies and children. This beach park has a lot to offer to families including: large and small pavilions for shade and parties, picnic tables, bathrooms, showers, a lifeguard, two large community built playgrounds, walking paths and large grassy areas. The beach consists of two ponds protected by a rock wall barrier that dissipates the energy of the incessant east side wind waves. The large pond is great for swimming and trying out your new snorkeling skills, while the smaller pond is perfect for wading with your infants and toddlers.

The ponds were built to allow the water to move freely through the spaces between the rocks. Juvenile fishes also move into the pond via these crevices and if they remain inside the pond and grow, they are unable to escape. That’s good news for those of you that like to snorkel. I often see over thirty species of fishes when I snorkel here. Turtles and eels can also be found in the pond from time to time, especially after a high tide. The protected area, calm water, posted lifeguard and variety of fish make this the perfect location to teach your kids (or yourself) how to snorkel. You can rent snorkel gear at any of the numerous snorkel rental locations around the island or pick up a cheap set at Wal-Mart near the airport. Be sure to bring a fish identification book to answer all your kids’ questions about what kinds of fish they saw.

Directly across the parking lot from the swimming area is a large community-built playground. There are swings, slides, bars, tires, walkways, swinging bridges, a volcano, tile benches, drinking fountains and all that wonderfully soft sawdust they pour on the ground to pad any falls. This playground is guaranteed to wear your little ones out! If it doesn’t, a second playground and bridge is located about ¼ mile away just south of this area. To get there you may drive, take a nice walk along the beach or use one of the many walking paths.

The Wailua area in general is rich in ancient historical sites. These sites are worth investigating. At the north end of Lydgate Park, you will find the Hauola Place of Refuge. This Place of Refuge was considered a safe zone for commoners who had broken a kapu or committed a crime. The rock wall remains also mark the site of the Hikini a ka la Heiau. You may also hunt for petroglyphs buried in the mouth of the Wailua River when it is calm and the water level is low. Be warned however, the beach at Wailua can be rough and a lifeguard is not always posted.

Enjoy your family together on the Garden Isle!


Kauai And Waimea Canyon

Waimea Canyon and Koke’e State Park offer vistas of all kinds — coastal, canyon, and koa forest. Mark Twain dubbed Waimea Canyon the “Grand Canyon of the Pacific,” and the title’s stuck – for good reason.

Eons of time, wind and rain carved this 3,567-foot deep, 14-mile long, one mile wide canyon into Kaua’i. It’s not nearly as grand as the Grand Canyon but it is pretty amazing to see – not just the novelty of a scene out of the Southwest on a tropical island, but the colorful, rugged beauty in itself. Shades of muted red, orange, green and purple appear at different times of day, much like the mainland version.

Waimea in Hawaiian means red waters. The streams of Waimea on Kauai (there’s also a Waimea on the Big Island) get their reddish hues from the red soil. A stream winds through the sunny and dry canyon and waterfalls trickle and tumble down the steep canyon walls. All that’s missing are the mules (although you will find mule rides on Molokai!).

Driving the Canyon Rim

The road follows the canyon rim, and along with the lookouts along the road, there’s an nice viewing area and parking lot. For the most sweeping view of the canyon, drive a little past the 10-mile marker on Highway 550. For a view of Waipio`o Falls, continue up 550 about 3/4 mile past the 12-mile marker. The viewing area isn’t marked, but it’s right across the street from a cluster of picnic pavilions and a comfort station.

Driving further up the road to where it ends at 4,000 feet, there’s a lookout that offers a glimpse into Kalalau Valley, literally the other side of the island where the Na Pali Coast can only be accessed only by an 11-mile hike. Often a foggy mist hangs over the cliffs, but don’t leave just yet. Every minute or so it clears revealing the the cliffs and ocean beyond. Then the mist returns, like a blanket in a game of peek a boo. There are times when you can’t get much of a peek though – early mornings are your best bet.

From the top, at Koke’e State Park, there are 28-miles of hiking trails, including excellent birdwatching trails. Magestic koa trees are among the main attractions at this Hawaii State Park.

Hiking Waimea Canyon

A popular scenic trail is the 1.8-mile Canyon Trail, which hugs the canyon’s rim and crosses Koke’e Stream.

Before you set out, stop by the Koke`e Museum, a treasure trove of information about the weather, plants and birds of Koke`e State Park and Wildlife Refuge. Their website also has tons of information about the State Park and its wildlife, as well as about Waimea Canyon. They offer guided hikes in the summer ($3 donation).

Waimea Canyon Climate

The upland terrain (3200 to 4200 feet) is cooler with occasional frost. Day temperatures vary from a 45°F average in January to 68°F in July. Annual rainfall is 70 inches with rainy periods from October to May.

Facilities

After your hike (or sight seeing), warm up in the cozy, Koke’e Lodge and enjoy a hot drink or meal. And if you want to stay overnight, there are the cabins and campgrounds detailed earlier in this guide.


Kauai Beaches

Kauai beachKauai is one of the Hawaiian Islands and is a most sought-after tourist destination. This 550 square-mile island was formed due to volcanic eruptions about six million years ago. It is one of the oldest islands, and is situated towards the northernmost part of Hawaii. Beaches of this island paradise are cradled by the sunny blue waters of the Pacific Ocean. It takes just twenty minutes to reach Kauai by air from Honolulu.

Kauai is divided into five geographical divisions, namely, North Shore, South Shore, Coconut Coast, Hanamalau Beach Park, and Lihue Kalapaki. North Shore has four prominent beaches. Anini Beach is actually a park. Restrooms, showers, tables, and barbecue facilities are available at this beach. Tourists require a camping permit if they wish to camp here. Another beach is Hanalei Bay. This beach is popular for its spectacular beauty. Stretches of half-moon shaped sandy beaches seem to be carved into the base of a sheer cliff. It makes a great spot for walking or just lazing around. Shoreline of this beach is calm and the water is quiet at the westernmost parts of the bay. This waterfront at north shore is too rough for safe swimming. Other beaches worth a visit on this part of the island are Kee Beach and the Honopu Valley.

The famed Kipu Kai Beach is located at the South Shore and offers a breath taking view of golden sands. The Kipu Kai beach is seemingly framed by the magnificent Hoary Head mountain ridge. This beach is accessible only by boat. Fewer tourists visit this beach, due to which this beach is naturally clean. Other beaches located on this part of the island are Kukuiolono Park, Mahaulepu Beach, and Poipu Beach Park.

Coconut Coast boasts six beaches that attract moonlight beach goers from all over the world. Hanamaulu Beach Park, Kalapaki Beach, Lydgate State Park, Ninini or Running Waters Beach, Niumalu Beach Park, and Niumalu Harbor are located at Coconut Coast. Lastly, a visit to Lihue Kalapaki Wailua River State Park is certainly not to be missed. This resort offers sun, sand, surf, and more.


Kauai Activities For The Disabled

Kauai DisabledPeople often think that their use of a wheelchair or scooter precludes a visit to more remote and natural environments. The wonderful thing about Kauai, since it is part of the United States and subject to the Americans with Disabilities Act, is that it is a handicap-accessible environment in a natural and beautiful setting. In fact, there is no reason that limited mobility should limit your ability to enjoy such a beautiful place! Kauai offers many opportunities for everyone. Here are a few tips for visiting:

PLAN YOUR ACTIVITIES

If you like photography, bring a telephoto lens and other equipment that does not require you to get up close to take a good photo. If you are going to relax, bring a bunch of books or load up your Kindle in advance. By thinking through exactly what you are going to do and going for, and making some early preparations at home, you can minimize the number of errands you need to do that might be harder to accomplish with some mobility or other restrictions in a new place. Save yourself as much time and effort as you can.

ACCOMMODATIONS

There are hundreds of places to stay in Kauai. Do your research and be sure to ask if there are plenty of ramps and elevators. Certain areas and condo complexes are known to be especially user-friendly for those with walking disabilities. A good place to start is by searching for “Poipu Paradise” in Google or another search engine. It will turn up a list of accommodations and you can start emailing or calling around for information quite easily.

TRANSPORTATION

-Handicap parking: bring your handicap sign or sticker to Kauai and put it on your rent car.
-Van Rental: you can rent a van from the Kauai Center for Independent Living.
-Public Buses: All public buses are lift-equipped.

EATING OUT

Make sure to just give the restaurant a call before you go or ensure your guidebook notes which restaurants have easy access. One call can save you a lot of effort!

THINGS TO DO

Many of the beaches provide an all-terrain wheelchair to visitors. The lifeguards at Poipu Beach Park, Lydgate Beach Park and Salt Pond Beach Park are happy to help you with this service, and it will allow easy access to all parts of the beach, water, and park.

Many other Kauai beaches have ample parking and no incline, making them suitable as well.

RENTING WHEELCHAIRS

The best place to find out this information and to arrange for wheelchair rental is to call Gammie Home Care (808-632-2333)


Kauai Golf

Kauai GolfThe island of Kauai is home to some of the most excellent golf courses in the world. If you so desire, you may be able to stay in a Kauai vacation rental right on one of these fine courses. Kauai boasts three of the top five courses in the State of Hawaii. Of the 8 courses on the island, four courses are designed by Robert Trent Jones, Jr. and two courses are designed by Jack Nicklaus. For golf aficionados when they think about golf on Kauai the naturally think about three renowned courses: Poipu Bay, Kauai Lagoons and Princeville. For those of you looking for a Kauai vacation rental, any of these three areas would offer premium accommodations. Most of the golf enthusiast also knows that Kauai is also home to one of America’s premium public golf courses. Wailua Municipal Golf Course is a par-72 course that plays to 7,020 yards. Wailua hosted the 1996 USGA Public Links Championship. The front nine begins with two spectacular holes bordering the ocean and is primarily flat with a few water hazards, none more impressive than the ocean. Wailua is also home to what many consider the most picturesque par 3 in the nation.

At Kiahuna Golf Club, which hosted the LPGA Worldwide Championship of Pro-AM Golf, you’ll find remnants of an ancient Hawaiian Village. These are carefully preserved in 27 different archaeological sites peppering the landscape. This par 70 track was designed and built by Robert Trent Jones Jr., who also created Poipu Bay Resort Course. If you want something even a little more dramatic and definitely worth leaving the comforts of your Kauai vacation rental for, head up the hills of Kalaheo to Kukuiolono Golf Course. There you will enjoy the views of sugar cane fields and the ocean as you experience true kama’aina golf on this spectacular nine-hole golf course. If you want to play them all, inquire with the friendly staff at hawaiianbeachrentals.com about the Kauai Golf Challenge. This unique promotion allows visitors to experience one round of golf at each of the islands best resorts for one special price.

This includes a round at Kauai Lagoons, Poipu Bay Golf Course and the Princeville Resort. If you didn’t already know, Robert Trent Jones Jr.’s Poipu Bay Resort Course has been compared to Pebble Beach with its magnificent setting on the ocean cliffs along Keoneloa Bay. You definitely don’t want to miss the Jack Nicklaus signature course at Kauai Lagoons. If you can get a Kauai vacation rental anywhere near here you should play this one more than once. It Is ranked among Golf Digests 100 greatest courses. The Prince Golf and Country Club by Robert Trent Jones Jr. and debuted as No. 5 among Golf Digests 75 best course in 1992. Being in Kauai in your vacation rental is wonderful and relaxing but there are few, if any, places in the world where you can play this caliber of golf on the same island so bring your sticks next time you come to Kauai.


Camping in Kauai

Camping in  KauaiKauai has four campgrounds located in its state parks. Two of these, both located in upland forest meadows are easily accessible by car, one, on a beach, is best reached by four-wheel, and the fourth is a backpacker’s campground at the end of the Na Pali’s 11-mile trail.

Koke`e State Park – Mosquito Free, Upland Camping on Kauai

Two campgrounds are found here in Koke`e State Park’s cool and misty uplands just a few miles from the desert dry Waimea Canyon. Many of the State Park’s numerous hiking trails begin near the campgrounds and meander through fragrant cedar and eucalyptus forests, under ancient koa and towering redwoods and past fragrant blossoms and succulent fruit.

It’s not what you might expect from a tropical vacation, but it is a very beautiful rainforest and for those interested in Hawaii’s flora and fauna very intriguing. The area is steeped in legend and also home to one of the island’s most magnificent vistas that opens up to the Na Pali. And an extra bonus – the mosquitos don’t care much for the coolness, so you will rarely see one, but you will see lots of colorful birds that also appreciate the mosquito free climes.

The temperature typically dips into the 40s at night up here at 3,600 feet, so bring or rent warm sleeping bags (or stay in one of the well heated cabins, cottages or YWCA hostel). The temperatures are quite pleasant in the daytime, and you will likely only want a lightweight rain jacket.

Koke`e State Park Campground

The State Park campground is situated in a long meadow bordered by tall evergreens. The Koke`e Natural History Museum and main office of the privately run Koke`e Lodge (with a restaurant/bar) also are right here. Like most of Hawaii’s State Park camp sites, it’s only $5 per tent site for the night. Camping permits can be booked up to a year in advance. If you’re not ok with getting up early though, this may not be the place for you – the resident roosters crow at dawn.

Camp Sloggett

The other campground in Koke`e State Park is Camp Sloggett, named after the family who donated this to the YWCA in 1938. This includes the tent sites (with showers and restrooms), a charming 1925 built lodge along with the bunkhouse (hostel) and beautiful grounds, all maintained by the Kauai YWCA. This is a fun place to stay – you’ll feel like your back at summer camp! There’s a historical fire pit with seats for 40 and lots of activities.

The campground’s rates are significantly higher than the Koke`e State Campground: $10 per person opposed to $5 per site, but this is a really fun and nice place for families, while the Koke`e State Park campground and private cabins mainly attract hunters and backpackers.

Na Pali Coast State Wilderness Park

This is backcountry camping for experienced backpackers and hikers. It is set on the Na Pali’s stunning rugged coastline at the 11-mile turn around point for the Kalalau Trail. Camping fee: $10, and instead of per site as with the other two, it’s per person on the Na Pali.

Camping on the Beach at Kauai’s Polihale State Park

This Polihale State Park campground is located on a strikingly gorgeous white sand beach on the sun drenched west side of the island near where the Na Pali Coast ends. It is an extension of Barking Sands Beach and has huge sand dunes, as tall as 100 feet in places.

The downsides to this campground: you need to traverse about 5 miles on a pot hole ridden dirt road. Most don’t go here without 4-wheel drive.

The other downside is that this is not a safe swimming beach due to its treacherous currents. There is the possibility of swimming in Queen’s Bath, a rock lined pool on the south end, but Queen’s Bath is only safe when the surf is small or the ocean is calm. Otherwise it is very dangerous. And there’s no lifeguard at this beach.

On the upside: the setting is as mentioned awesome and you’ll have romantic sunsets, views of the Na Pali, shore fishing (when it’s calm), restrooms, picnic shelters, camping areas, outdoor showers and drinking water. Camp sites here are $5 per night.

Camping Kauai can be a really fun way to save money and meet locals and other visiting campers, if you enjoy camping. And if you do, there could be just the perfect campground for you on the Garden Isle.

For more easily accessible beach campgrounds on Kauai, click on my profile and read my article on Kauai’s County Campgrounds. Learn more about the Garden Isle here: [http://www.coconutroads.com/Kauai.html]

Or get all my camping in Hawaii and other accommodation information complete with links to photos, directions, and more in my Hawaii Eco Travel & Budget Guide to Kauai. There’s a guide for each of Hawaii’s main four islands that shows you how to vacation in Hawaii on a shoestring.


Kauai Restaurants

Kauai RestuarantsKauai Restaurants

If you want to enjoy mouth-watering spicy dishes while touring and staying in Kauai on your Hawaii vacation, visiting to any one of the ocean front Kauai Asian restaurants would be just ideal for you. Owing to their stylish delicious preparation and supporting with wide collection of yummy food items, these restaurants have gradually become one of the most sought after dining options in the island. You may find numerous Kauai Asian restaurants while enjoying beach beauties here and there in Kauai, but all are not highly appreciable for their food items and the ambiances they offer. However, few prominent and reputed dining places in Kauai where you may find authenticated Asian foods with varied aromas to delight your dream Hawaii vacation may include:

o Aroma, 3501 Rice St, Lihue, HI-96766, Tele. 808-245-9192
o Beach House, 5022 Lawai Rd, Koloa, HI-96756, Tele. 808-742-1424
o Gaylord’s, 3-2087 Kaumualii Hwy, Lihue, HI-96766, Tele. 808-245-9593
o Hamura Saimin, 2956 Kress St, Lihue, HI-96766, Tele. 808-245-3271
o Lighthouse Bistro, 2484 Keneke St, Kilauea, HI-96746, Tele. 808-828-0481
o Mema Thai and Chinese Cuisine, 4-369 Kuhio Hwy, Kapaa, HI-96746, Tele.
808-823-0899
o Roy’s Poipu Bar & Grill, 2360 Kiahuna Plantation Dr, Koloa, HI-96756, Tele.
808-742-5000
o Sushi Blues (Bouchons Hanalei), 5-5190 Kuhio Hwy, Hanalei, HI-96714, Tele.
808-826-9701
o Tidepools, 1571 Poipu Rd, Koloa, HI-96756, Tele. 808-742-1234

The Kauai Asian restaurants are known for their extravagant oceanfront setting to allow local and outside tourists to enjoy most pleasing Hawaii vacation dining experience. You will highly appreciate the patronage of gracious Hawaiian services coupled with innovative approaches towards preparation and servicing of unbeatable luscious Asian dishes there.

Along with providing all types of succulent Thai, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, and Pacific Rim food items, all of the Kauai Asian restaurants also offer traditional and contemporary sea-food products. However, you must not forget tasting the following special menus while visiting any of the Kauai Asian restaurants on your Hawaii vacation.

o Beef Salad
o Fresh Island Shrimp
o Ginger Coconut Soup

You will find majority of the Asian restaurants in Kauai are kept open on all days of the week offering hottest Asian entertainment in the evening, thereby making them natural choice for the visitors to have romantic dinner with fun-filled luxurious leisure!


Kauai Activities

Kauai ArtivitiesKauai Activities For An Outstanding Vacation

Kauai, however, is renown for its stunning beauty. The oldest of the main Hawaiian Islands, Kauai is made up of topography varying from meandering rivers and streams to the jaw-dropping 4,000-foot cliffs of Na Pali Coast and 10-mile-long, 2-mile-wide, 3,600-foot-deep Waimea Canyon.

At the center of this nearly-round island, Mt. Waialeale rises more than 5,000 feet. This extinct volcano is among the wettest spots on earth, with about 480 inches of rain falling each year. Its dark green slopes are striped with white cascades. But the precipitation is very localized; an arid region a few miles west receives just 6 inches per year. Lava streams on the mountain spew miniature rivers, and waters running down the slopes carved out Na Pali Coast and other cliffs. Elsewhere on Kauai, the striking vistas consist of taro patches, sugar cane fields and quiet little towns.

Kauai is the northernmost of the main Hawaiian Islands, and sightseeing choices run the gamut from difficult hikes to helicopter tours. Kauai has plenty to see: plantation villages, a historic lighthouse, wildlife refuges, a fern grotto, a colorful canyon and deep rivers. The island also contains first-class spas, golf courses and some of the world’s most beautiful beaches. In fact, the main road around Kauai’s perimeter runs past more scenery than would seem possible on a small island.

Kauai receives more rain than the rest of Hawaii and is covered with a big variety of flowers and other vegetation. When showers hit, the island is shrouded in mist and takes on a mystical beauty. The sunniest regions are on the south side and to the west, where the island’s longest beach, 15-mile Polihale, is found. Kauai’s northern shores, where rain is most frequent, are a brilliant green.

Kauai’s beauty overshadows its tourism industry. The island is not for people who thrive on crowds or nightlife. Its main draw is outdoor activities, including excellent hiking, camping and scuba diving. Yet Kauai does have first-class resorts. The most gorgeous beaches are the sandy shores on the north coast. However, during the winter, the waves are too rough for swimming, snorkeling or scuba diving. At that time of the year, water lovers migrate to Poipu at the south end or the Coconut Coast to the east.

Princeville is the center of attraction on the island’s north side. The spectacular landscape is comprised of lush sea cliffs towering over picturesque Hanalei Bay. In addition to the beach, superior golf courses lure visitors. Na Pali Coast, the jewel of Kauai, is west of Princeville on the northern edge. The Coconut Coast encompasses Wailua and Kapaa, and is another popular golfing destination. On the east side south of Wailua is Lihue, the primary financial district, which is studded with hotels and condos. Poipu on the southern coast is the island’s sunniest area and most popular resort.

Kauai’s finest resort has thankfully been restored to its former glory. Now one of Starwood’s St. Regis properties, the Princeville Resort offers the ultimate in luxury and amenities. In fact, the waters of Hanalei Bay at the Resort stay calm all year, protected by the Anini reef. Other blue-chip resorts include the Westin Princeville Ocean Resort Villas on the northern coast; Castle Kiahuna Planta and Beach Bungalows, Koa Kea Hotel and Resort, Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort and Spa and Marriott’s Waiohai Beach Club in Poipu; Outrigger Waipouli Beach Resort and Coral Reef Hotel in Kapaa; and Marriott Kauai Resort and Beach Club in Lihue. Memorable Kauai vacations are easy to book online. For a complete package at surprisingly low prices, visit KauaiActivities.org